fbpx

Question: My husband died without a will and there isn’t a lot of money, do I have to apply for letters of administration?

Question: My husband died without a will and there isn’t a lot of money, do I have to apply for letters of administration?

Typically, when a person dies without a Last Will and Testament, the person who will be acting as the executor needs to apply to the local Surrogate’s Court for the Letters of Administration. (Technically speaking, if there is no will, the executor is called an “administrator,” but that’s a different blog post.)   There are three common exceptions to the requirement to

How Long Will It Take to Get Your Inheritance?

How Long Will It Take to Get Your Inheritance?

You hang up the phone, you’re sad to hear your Grandmother passed away, but you’re also a little bit excited by the idea that you might get some money from her will. She lived a good, long life, it wasn’t unexpected. Sure, you’ll miss her amazing chocolate chip cookies, but maybe you can finally buy that silver, 6-speed manual convertible that you’ve been eyeing

The Top 8 Outrageous Last Will and Testament Provisions

The Top 8 Outrageous Last Will and Testament Provisions

A Last Will and Testament is a person’s last chance to have a say in what happens on this planet earth. Some people take those desires and intentions to extremes, whether that’s by weaponizing their will and causing irreparable harm or even death; it’s further discrimination that the testator practiced in life, or just having a lark at other’s expense. Your last

Living Wills: Past, Present, and Unique Requests for Care

Living Wills: Past, Present, and Unique Requests for Care

Like in most things, necessity is the mother of invention. “Living wills” were first proposed by individuals who were unable to enforce medical directives through a Power of Attorney. In the 1960s and 70s, legislation was being introduced in Florida and California to give legal enforcement to living wills that   It wasn’t until 1976 that California became the first state